Why Customer Obsession (Like Any Obsession) Can Be Creepy (and Unhealthy!) 😱

Eeman Bulotano
October 16, 2022
Creepy Customer Obsession

Is being overly customer-centric human-centric? Let's see.

The Thin Lines Between Passions and Obsessions

The customer experience is one of the most powerful forces in business today. It’s a force that has enabled companies to grow rapidly and become household names, but it can also be dangerous if not managed properly. There are many examples of companies that have made mistakes when it comes to this topic, from over-focusing on customers to ignoring their employees and neglecting their own mental health. In this article, we’ll explore why customer obsession (like any obsession) can be scary and unhealthy!

Digital Transformation has caused us to place an overwhelming amount of importance on the customer experience.

Digital Transformation has caused us to place an overwhelming amount of importance on the customer experience. Customers are more important than ever before, and they expect a personalized experience every time they interact with your business.

It’s easy to get caught up in this trend, but it’s important to remember that digital transformation isn’t just about technology—it’s also about people. And while it’s true that customers have access to more information than ever before (and often way too much), there are still ways you can use digital transformation strategies like customer experience optimization (CXO) or personalization software to help them navigate their way through all those options!

Many companies are pushing their employees to the point of burnout in the name of the customer experience.

It’s easy to get caught up in this trend, but it’s important to remember that digital transformation isn’t just about technology—it’s also about people. And while it’s true that customers have access to more information than ever before (and often way too much), there are still ways you can use digital transformation strategies like customer experience optimization (CXO) or personalization software to help them navigate their way through all those options!

But what happens if you don’t give them any room in which to rest? What happens if you expect them not only to do everything for another person but also do so without taking care of themselves first? If you push yourself or your team until exhaustion sets in—then how will anyone else know when it’s time for a break?

Customers don’t always know what they want, and they sometimes try to make unhealthy demands on companies.

Customers aren’t always right, and they don’t always know what they want.

In fact, customers can be unreasonable—or even make unhealthy demands of companies that are unhealthy for them (and everyone around them). For example:

  • A customer may ask for a refund if their product doesn’t work as advertised. While this is clearly unfair and unwise on the part of the business, it’s also unrealistic for them to expect any other outcome than what they’re requesting in return for their money.
  • A customer may ask for a refund if their product doesn’t work as advertised. While this is clearly unfair and unwise on the part of the business, it’s also unrealistic for them to expect any other outcome than what they’re requesting in return for their money.

Companies may be putting so much stock in the customer experience that they are neglecting their own employees and their own mental health.

The customer experience, or the interactions between a company and its customers, is an important part of any business. But it also comes with a cost: employee well-being.

In order for businesses to be successful, they need employees who are happy and healthy. Employees who are in good physical health can handle their work better and do more work than those who aren’t—and there’s nothing wrong with that! But when you’re feeling physically exhausted all of the time? That can affect how much energy you have left over at the end of each day (or week), which may impact how well your interactions with customers go down during peak hours on weekends or holidays. This kind of burnout has been linked to higher rates of depression among employees as well as lower productivity levels overall—and both effects have been shown time and time again across industries like retail stores where many people spend their days interacting one-on-one with others without having any control over what happens outside their office doors.”

Why Customer Obsession (Like Any Obsession) Can Be Creepy (and Unhealthy!) 😱 1

Over-focusing on customers can be just as bad as not focusing on them at all.

It’s a good idea to focus on your customers. But it can also be bad. Too much focus on the customer experience can lead to burnout, neglecting employees, and neglecting your own mental health. So how do you balance these two ideas? The answer is to focus on the customer experience, but don’t forget about the people behind the scenes. You can have a great company culture that makes employees feel valued and supported while also providing an amazing customer experience.

The truth is that you can’t have one without the other. If your employees aren’t happy, they won’t provide great customer service. The same goes for a bad experience—if customers are upset, chances are good that it will be reflected in how your employees interact with them. The bottom line is that you need to be able to provide both great customer service and nice company culture. You can’t have one without the other.

The customer experience is important, but only if you respect both your employees and your customers. All the humans involved.

Customer experience is important, but only if you respect both your employees and your customers. All the humans involved. I remember working somewhere with a terrible customer experience. We were so focused on making sure that our customers were happy with the product or service that we forgot about ourselves—the people who actually made it happen. We lost sight of what really mattered: building relationships with people who mattered most in our lives (humans).

I’m not sure if this was due to inexperience or lack of empathy for them—or even just being blinded by ambition—but it didn’t matter because no one cared about either side of this equation at that time anyway; all anyone cared about was revenue growth and it wasn’t even able to reach remarkable changes. Just… steads-ok-meh type of change. Yikes.

Designing Experiences for Humans, by Humans, with Humans.

It’s hard to balance customer experiences with the needs of employees, but it’s not impossible. If you’re a company that is struggling with this balancing act, consider making sure that the people who are working for and with you are happy and healthy in their own right. This could make your company better off in the long run because it will be more likely to attract good people who want to work there because they love what they do—not because they’re just blindly following orders from some corporate edict.

Check out how we’re trying to build our own processes, policies, and procedures to be more human!

By: <a href="https://hooman.design/team/eeman" target="_blank">Eeman Bulotano</a>

By: Eeman Bulotano

Founder and Chief Digital Officer. Full Stack CX Design and Development. Digital Experience Professional. Business Development / Design. Branding. Beat Making.

Human
Stories 📰

Just us discussing human stuff. Blogs, Videos,
Infographics, anything human. From humans.

View Stories